Username Post: Common mistakes for first-year conventions        (Topic#69)
PatrickD 
Executive Producer
PatrickD
Loc: California
Reg: 12-07-06

12-29-06 04:22 PM - Post#137    

I thought it might be helpful for some people who have been to or staffed a bunch of conventions to start making a list of common mistakes seen at first year events. Who knows, maybe it will drag some fun stories out of people.

I've been to somewhere on the order of 40 conventions now. (I need to sit down and count again.) A fair share of them have been first-year events...so I've seen a few of these first-hand. Others have been mistakes I've noticed in the past several years of running this web site:

* Don't over-estimate your attendance.
I've seen more than a handful of conventions say that they'll have X thousand people in their first year...when the convention is in the middle of nowhere. First year attendance really depends on the location and how much publicity the convention does before the event, so it is entirely possible that a first year convention could get, oh, let's say 4,110 people (as in the case of Anime Boston 2003)...but that's more of the exception than the norm. From what I've seen, most first years are 200 to 500 people. Unless you're in a region with a lot of people 25 and under that currently doesn't have an anime con within 4 hours, don't budget for more than that...unless pre-registration numbers start to contradict it.

* Don't copy/paste content from other conventions.
Plagarism is bad. Period. I don't think I even need to explain this one.

* Don't announce guests before they've said they're coming.
There have been a few times a guest has e-mailed me asking me to remove them from a guest listing on this site because the convention posted them on the web site before waiting for a confirmation. Um... Oops! IMHO, it's best to keep the names of your invited guests under wraps until you know for sure if they can come or not.

* Don't announce dates or a location before you sign the contract.
If I had a dollar for every time I saw a convention's web site that said "We will be held MARCH 6-8, location TBA"...well, I'd have enough money for lunch at Denny's. Probably 75% of the time the dates end up changing when the location is announced. You'd just better hope your attendees notice the date change. You're better off seeing what dates work for the hotel(s) before asking the world to set that weekend aside.

* Don't spam other cons' forums.
It's okay to put your con's web site in your signature and participate in discussions on another convention's forum...but to go into the middle of their general discussion area and post a blatant ad for your con? That's bad form. It won't win you any friends. ...and I've seen it done. If a convention has a dedicated forum for talk about other conventions, it may be okay there.

I'm sure I'll think up more stuff, but I'll let someone else have a turn now.
-PatrickD
AnimeCons.com Executive Producer
Co-Founder: Anime Boston and Providence Anime Conference
Host of The Chibi Project & Anime Unscripted™


 
echeng 
Attendee
echeng
Loc: NY
Reg: 12-29-06

12-29-06 06:59 PM - Post#138    
    In response to PatrickD

I'll chime in here with a few:

* Don't expect to fund your convention based on pre-registration fees.
I've seen a few start-up conventions make this mistake. You should always secure some kind of capital to act as seed money for the first event. You'll fail before you even start if you're expecting pre-registrations to cover the cost of deposit for whatever venue you are considering. And I'll add that you shouldn't use credit cards to get you started. Find suitable financing from a reputable source, whether that's a otaku benefactor or a bank, make sure you do this.

* Don't forget to protect yourself financially.
That means incorporating so that you are not personally held liable for debts incurred by your event. If you don't have the money to incorporate, then take a step back and think hard about whether you want to foot the bill if, heavemnforbid, the convention is in the red. And don't forget about securing event insurance, too.

AnimeNEXT 2007 the NEXT evolution of anime convention
June 6-8 @ Meadowlands Expo Center (NY/NJ)


 
TPod 
Newbie
TPod
Loc: Nashville, TN
Reg: 12-21-06

12-29-06 07:56 PM - Post#139    
    In response to PatrickD

And another that I recently saw:

* Don't Announce Your Con Venue/Hotel before you even have a signed contract
Venues DO check the websites of their prospective clients and if they see you've already announced their location as the con's venue, you've lost nearly all leverage in the negotiating department. And if it turns out you have to change venues and/or dates, your event winds up looking very foolish.

 
PatrickD 
Executive Producer
PatrickD
Loc: California
Reg: 12-07-06

12-29-06 10:58 PM - Post#140    
    In response to echeng

  • E Cheng Said:
And don't forget about securing event insurance, too.


Yes! That's a very important and probably overlooked step. It can save you in the unlikely event someone trips and falls down the stairs. Event insurance isn't that expensive for more than enough coverage and it can really save you. Some places won't even let you set up your convention until you can provide proof of insurance.
-PatrickD
AnimeCons.com Executive Producer
Co-Founder: Anime Boston and Providence Anime Conference
Host of The Chibi Project & Anime Unscripted™


 
echeng 
Attendee
echeng
Loc: NY
Reg: 12-29-06

12-30-06 02:03 AM - Post#141    
    In response to PatrickD

  • PatrickD Said:
* Don't over-estimate your attendance.
I've seen more than a handful of conventions say that they'll have X thousand people in their first year...when the convention is in the middle of nowhere. First year attendance really depends on the location and how much publicity the convention does before the event, so it is entirely possible that a first year convention could get, oh, let's say 4,110 people (as in the case of Anime Boston 2003)...but that's more of the exception than the norm. From what I've seen, most first years are 200 to 500 people. Unless you're in a region with a lot of people 25 and under that currently doesn't have an anime con within 4 hours, don't budget for more than that...unless pre-registration numbers start to contradict it.



I was just re-reading one of your comments and thought of an important corollary to this one:

* Don't cast your publicity net too wide.
Many people don't go to are reluctant to go to first year events because there is no track record. The probability that someone will attend your event gets decreases dramatically the further they are from your event. Your publicity strategy for the first year should reflect this by targeting the local area. It seems counter-intuitive, but you'll find a bigger bang for your buck if you stick to the immediate area. Funds will be tight the first year, and you're better off spending your advertising dollars where they'll be the most effective. Think locally in your first year, and you can expand in the future.
AnimeNEXT 2007 the NEXT evolution of anime convention
June 6-8 @ Meadowlands Expo Center (NY/NJ)


Edited by echeng on 12-30-06 02:03 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
bekka_alice 
Attendee

Reg: 12-21-06

12-30-06 04:31 AM - Post#142    
    In response to echeng

Let's see - my opinions on things to add -

Don't start a con before you work a con, so you have any idea what kind of organizational structure is needed and why.

Don't count your chickens before they're hatched - or pluck, boil, and plan dinner on them before they're hatched. Even if you think you will have a good cash flow in the first year, plan your money that year as if you have to make one year's budget last for five. There are a lot of very fun things that can be done for little money, and a lot of good venues for a start-up con that are not too expensive - don't try to start up the first year in the city's Convention Center.

You do not have to have 50 guests your first year - you don't even have to have 5. The best guests are those who are interactive and friendly with the attendees and the attendees can learn from them - so you may have excellent guests locally available in the form of comic artists or cultural teachers. Fill in your event schedule with things that are fun and hands-on and creative and that's what people will remember.

Don't waste free opportunities. Don't forget to look around and see if you have local resources like newsletters, restaurants, comic shops or other places willing to let you post information on your event.

Don't lie to your constituency. Don't tell press and dealers you have 500 pre-reg when you have 50 - bad news travels fast and yes, they can tell that the "echoingly huge hallways" are not the reason that foot traffic seems slow. On that note, don't fail to live up to your obligations either - if you have a refund to post or a contract to fulfill, do right by the person expecting it.

Make sure to organize a good number of sensible, smart, dedicated and at least nominally sane people to head up the effort with you. It can't be done by one person or even by one person dragging around fifty people behind them. Divide responsibilities clearly so that if possible no one is overwhelmed or doing duplicate work. If you see someone you thought was stable flaking out, take action quickly to shore up their department and make sure things aren't forgotten or left behind. Keep looking for good staff all the time, as you may find that you have a set of duties that isn't fully covered, and it's always good to have an understudy for critical jobs. Don't neglect meetings - and make sure when you do meet you cover a clear agenda to stay aware of updates and possible sticking points in all areas.

Keep on top of bills due and deposits needed and make sure all are done on time - the last thing you need is to have to explain to everyone why there is no con because the payment didn't go through.

Study your intended area carefully before deciding it needs an anime con. Why does there need to be an anime con there? Is there one (or more) already close by (i.e. within two hours' drive time)? If so would your effort be more profitably and usefully spent in assisting that convention instead? What are the demographics of the area - will you pull enough people to make the con a go? Will you have enough staff in a central area to be able to meet frequently and effectively?

That's my li'l thought for the day.

 
Mark W. Hamilton 
Attendee
Mark W. Hamilton
Loc: Oshawa, Ont, Canada
Reg: 12-20-06

12-30-06 10:15 PM - Post#152    
    In response to PatrickD

  • PatrickD Said:
  • E Cheng Said:
And don't forget about securing event insurance, too.


Yes! That's a very important and probably overlooked step. It can save you in the unlikely event someone trips and falls down the stairs. Event insurance isn't that expensive for more than enough coverage and it can really save you. Some places won't even let you set up your convention until you can provide proof of insurance.



I know form my experiences researching a into a few hotels here in canada as well as dealing with our current venue, that we can't sign the contract unless we have the certificate from the insurance company clearing stating the venues name on it as being covered.
Northern Anime Festival,
Mark W. Hamilton
ITS & Liaison Director


 
SyFyCon 
Con Regular

Reg: 12-27-06

12-30-06 11:57 PM - Post#154    
    In response to PatrickD

  • PatrickD Said:
* Don't announce dates or a location before you sign the contract.



Corollary: Do not get hosed on the hotel contract. This is the number one reason cons die. I've seen it happen numerous times, as have others on this forum. Connecticon barely survived a $45,000 hotel bill. Robert Jenks of AnimeFEST! is the expert on hotel negotiations (he used to be a hotel manager), but here are some tips that have worked for me not only in major metropolitan areas such as Washington, DC, but also resort beach towns. Remember, this is for hotel cons only (which is how a con should start):

1) Put out an RFP (Request For Proposal) to multiple locations, even if you already have a location in mind. You can negotiate for cheaper deals by stating the lowest rate that you received (don't tell them where it came from, though).

2) Require a stipulation that you have zero dollars ($0) of space rental if you meet a certain number of room rentals. Be realistic. 50 rooms per night is probably good for a first year con, but even that number might be too high if you are in a rural area with no major cities to draw from nearby.

3) State in the RFP that a sliding scale for space rental is required in the proposal. Let's say you pay $500 per day for all your space if you meet 25 rooms a night (you'll be lucky to get it this low).

4) Do NOT ever be fiscally liable for over $5,000 in the first year. You may need to look at the fine print with a microscope but make sure this requirement is met.

 
A Gigantic Panda 
Attendee
A Gigantic Panda
Loc: Destroying Tokyo, Japan
Reg: 01-03-07

01-03-07 07:59 PM - Post#183    
    In response to SyFyCon

So Pat, what is the purpose of having AB non-profit? (or NEAS non-profit) Is it benefical for throwing a con?
- AGiganticPanda

AB '03/'04/'05-Security
Portcon '06-Security
Portcon '07-Security/Presentation Graphic Designer

What if all the wor ld's in side of your hea d
just cre a tions of your own.


 
PatrickD 
Executive Producer
PatrickD
Loc: California
Reg: 12-07-06

01-03-07 09:48 PM - Post#191    
    In response to A Gigantic Panda

  • A Gigantic Panda Said:
So Pat, what is the purpose of having AB non-profit? (or NEAS non-profit) Is it benefical for throwing a con?


The big advantage? Exemption from federal income tax. That alone is reason enough.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-profit_organ ization
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/501%28c%29

A lot (but not all) anime conventions are run by non-profit organizations.
-PatrickD
AnimeCons.com Executive Producer
Co-Founder: Anime Boston and Providence Anime Conference
Host of The Chibi Project & Anime Unscripted™


 
A Gigantic Panda 
Attendee
A Gigantic Panda
Loc: Destroying Tokyo, Japan
Reg: 01-03-07

01-04-07 05:19 PM - Post#199    
    In response to PatrickD

Anime cons would fall under

501(c)(3) - Various charitable, non-profit, religious, and educational

right?
- AGiganticPanda

AB '03/'04/'05-Security
Portcon '06-Security
Portcon '07-Security/Presentation Graphic Designer

What if all the wor ld's in side of your hea d
just cre a tions of your own.


 
PatrickD 
Executive Producer
PatrickD
Loc: California
Reg: 12-07-06

01-04-07 06:17 PM - Post#201    
    In response to A Gigantic Panda

Yes.
-PatrickD
AnimeCons.com Executive Producer
Co-Founder: Anime Boston and Providence Anime Conference
Host of The Chibi Project & Anime Unscripted™


 
echeng 
Attendee
echeng
Loc: NY
Reg: 12-29-06

01-08-07 07:46 PM - Post#220    
    In response to SyFyCon

  • Anime South Said:
4) Do NOT ever be fiscally liable for over $5,000 in the first year. You may need to look at the fine print with a microscope but make sure this requirement is met.



Good advice, though I think the $5,000 number shouldn't be a hard rule. It all depends on your market, and hotel facility rental rates can vary widely depending on your location. In my local area, the initial outlay could be well in excess of $10,000 for a hotel with a decent amount of function space.

For example, we just held MangaNEXT in a hotel with about 20,000 sq.ft. of space, and the rental came out to $15,000 over three days with no sliding scale. A lot of the hotels in our area don't even offer a sliding scale anymore, sadly.
AnimeNEXT 2007 the NEXT evolution of anime convention
June 6-8 @ Meadowlands Expo Center (NY/NJ)


 
Mark W. Hamilton 
Attendee
Mark W. Hamilton
Loc: Oshawa, Ont, Canada
Reg: 12-20-06

01-08-07 08:20 PM - Post#223    
    In response to echeng

For that very reason of cost is why Northern Anime Festival is still to this date located on a college campus. heh. The cost for us at Durham College this year is only about $4,000(CDN) and thats for Saturday and Sunday.

I would recommend, to anyone starting out an event to look at universitys and colleges as potential venues for your first years, heck you might just win the support the the Student Unions and Campus clubs to help the costs.
Northern Anime Festival,
Mark W. Hamilton
ITS & Liaison Director


 
The Marionette 
Attendee

Loc: Wichita, KS
Reg: 01-19-07

01-19-07 06:34 PM - Post#349    
    In response to bekka_alice

We learned our first year, don't underestimate the anime fans in your area. We're in Wichita, KS, where the closest con is about 2 hours away, I think, and had just started up that year, and was quite small (400 attendees first year?) and wasn't well publicized in our area. Anime fans in our area were starving for a con, apparently.

Our first year we had lots of mistakes, we admitted it. One of them was HOPING for at least 500 attendees. (Probably including staff.) Well, by a stroke of luck, the local newspaper decided to run a front-page article about the con a week before. Our little one-day festival in a theatre meant for 1,300-ish SEATED ended up getting over the course of the day exactly 1,234 paid attendees including giveaway tickets.

It was crowded. It smelled. It was also a blast, but a lot of people complained, and we had to be very nice to the fire marshall.

Do not rent a very small space if you're in a largish city that doesn't have anywhere nearby to go a'conning.
Anime Festival Wichita
Cosplay Director
Site Coordinator
Gameshow Director


 
Kimichou 
Attendee
Kimichou
Loc: PA
Reg: 01-28-07

01-28-07 05:22 PM - Post#454    
    In response to Mark W. Hamilton

  • Mark W. Hamilton Said:

I would recommend, to anyone starting out an event to look at universitys and colleges as potential venues for your first years, heck you might just win the support the the Student Unions and Campus clubs to help the costs.



We held our first event this past November and had around 250 attendees (we thought we'd only get 100 if we were lucky). We held it at the college our anime club is at and we didn't have to pay at all for the space (then again, this was our comunity service project and we gave half of proceeds to the USO).

Colleges are good places to have first time cons, you have access to supplies like projectors, screens, tvs, mics, etc. Also, its easy to spread the word about the con around campus.

Also, college staff and security may be willing to help out too.
~~Shikkaricon Founder (con now defunct)~~
http://shikkari.sora-hana.net





Edited by Kimichou on 01-28-07 05:23 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Bryguy 
Con Regular

Loc: Edmonton, Canada
Reg: 01-05-07

02-12-07 05:39 PM - Post#597    
    In response to Kimichou

Actually when you look at it a lot of the anime conventions in Canada are located on a college or university campus.
Mind you with the exception of events in Toronto I don't believe any other anime convention in Canada has exceeded 5000 unique attendees either so that might have something to do with it.
Bryan Kennedy
- Animethon 20 Chairman


 
Mark W. Hamilton 
Attendee
Mark W. Hamilton
Loc: Oshawa, Ont, Canada
Reg: 12-20-06

02-12-07 09:34 PM - Post#606    
    In response to Bryguy

If we reached passed 5000 unique attendees, I think I would run out of the college screaming.

Probably not but maybe if that happened this year...

However, while on that topic- what is the average you say a college based anime con attendees are at? may the 250 we're seeing annualy isnt so bad after all?
Northern Anime Festival,
Mark W. Hamilton
ITS & Liaison Director


 
Bryguy 
Con Regular

Loc: Edmonton, Canada
Reg: 01-05-07

02-13-07 12:35 AM - Post#608    
    In response to Mark W. Hamilton

I think that entirely depends on where the convention is, the size of the city/town, and how long the convention has run. Probably a couple other things as well.

Anime Evolution, Animethon, Otafest, and the new Otakuthon are all on a college or university campus in a relatively decent or large city.
They seem to have roughly 2000-3500 each last year.

Smaller & newer ones like yourselves and Nishikaze seem to be around 250 so that consistent.

As for the 3 or 4 1-day high school events we have in and around Edmonton here they typically get somewhere between 75-125 or so.

So not too bad at all. Just watch out because it's typically the smaller events that explode in size

Although I think that just goes to show that it's easier for smaller cons to happen at a local college or university. As some have mentioned they get great deals on rental costs (some get for free it seems).

However you'll notice very few, if any, anime conventions at a university or college with more then 5000 paid attendees.
Bryan Kennedy
- Animethon 20 Chairman


Edited by Bryguy on 02-13-07 12:43 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Daniel DAmours 
Attendee

Loc: Thunder Bay
Reg: 04-11-08

04-11-08 08:55 PM - Post#2447    
    In response to Bryguy

  • Bryguy Said:
I think that entirely depends on where the convention is, the size of the city/town, and how long the convention has run. Probably a couple other things as well.

Anime Evolution, Animethon, Otafest, and the new Otakuthon are all on a college or university campus in a relatively decent or large city.
They seem to have roughly 2000-3500 each last year.

Smaller & newer ones like yourselves and Nishikaze seem to be around 250 so that consistent.

As for the 3 or 4 1-day high school events we have in and around Edmonton here they typically get somewhere between 75-125 or so.

So not too bad at all. Just watch out because it's typically the smaller events that explode in size

Although I think that just goes to show that it's easier for smaller cons to happen at a local college or university. As some have mentioned they get great deals on rental costs (some get for free it seems).

However you'll notice very few, if any, anime conventions at a university or college with more then 5000 paid attendees.




Especially Conventions in Areas that did not have one there before. We had 112 in attendance last year. From the looks of it we are going to have 200~300 this year. I am glad that i decided to use the University for our first year. And we were able to get 50% off rooms/equipment because a lot of staff were attending LU. so what was going to cost $1400 for our first year was only about $700 giving us plenty of seed money for this year.
Lakehead Anime Society Director, & Chairman of Kita-Kon
kita-kon.org


 
jnik 
Attendee
jnik
Reg: 12-18-06

04-13-08 07:02 PM - Post#2450    
    In response to Daniel DAmours

  • Crunchbite Said:
Especially Conventions in Areas that did not have one there before. We had 112 in attendance last year. From the looks of it we are going to have 200~300 this year.


Location's got a lot to do with it, too. You don't have a lot of population to draw from within a couple hours' drive, and for those willing to travel long distances there are a lot of other options.

If I find myself with some money burning a hole in my pocket, I might have to come up, though...haven't been in town for 15 years.
Jon Niehof


 
Daniel DAmours 
Attendee

Loc: Thunder Bay
Reg: 04-11-08

04-13-08 08:49 PM - Post#2451    
    In response to jnik

Actually when you think about we don't have to bad of a population if you take Northern MN into account we have about 500,000 people in less than a 4hour drive. Its not like what you have in New England but its enough.

Have you lived or visited Thunder Bay before then? Maybe this will stop some people from leaving >_>
Lakehead Anime Society Director, & Chairman of Kita-Kon
kita-kon.org


Edited by Crunchbite on 04-13-08 08:51 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Wilwarin 
Attendee
Wilwarin
Loc: Nebraska, USA
Reg: 02-27-08

04-15-08 02:11 PM - Post#2462    
    In response to Bryguy

  • Bryguy Said:
Anime Evolution, Animethon, Otafest, and the new Otakuthon are all on a college or university campus in a relatively decent or large city.
They seem to have roughly 2000-3500 each last year.



Same with Anime NebrasKon. It's our 5th year, and we're still on a university campus, because all of the hotels and event centers nearby are too expensive or they don't have the room space.
Anime Nebraskon staff
http://www.animenebraskon.com/



 
Fedora 
Con Regular
Fedora
Loc: Suffolk UK & NH USA
Reg: 12-22-06

07-29-08 07:18 AM - Post#2887    
    In response to PatrickD

  • PatrickD Said:
  • A Gigantic Panda Said:
So Pat, what is the purpose of having AB non-profit? (or NEAS non-profit) Is it benefical for throwing a con?


The big advantage? Exemption from federal income tax. That alone is reason enough.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-profit_organ ization
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/501%28c%29
A lot (but not all) anime conventions are run by non-profit organizations.




The main problem with Anime Cons here in the UK is that they get TAXED to the sky. Unless they have an attendance under or up too 1,500.

That’s the main reason there is no Large scale (1,500+) Anime Cons here. The only Convention that comes close to what would be an North American style Anime Convention with over 1,500 is the MCM London Expo. They claim to have a though the door attendance of about 15-20 thousand according to there PR Manager. However there has been no official announcement of numbers they don’t claim to be a 100% real McCoy Anime Event. They are a mixed ScFi Pop culture event.

However if you walked though the event hall you would swore your at a Anime Con. The under 25's have basically invaded and taken over this event and made it there oven, since London Lacks a Large Anime Convention. Neither MCM or there competitor Showmasters wants to put on an Anime only Event in London or the UK. They say there is no market share for such an event in the UK according to the PR rep for Showmasters and the MCM.

I would ask the question then why do all Anime Conventions in the UK always hit the attendance cap then? Even the small events get 200-500 people that are out side of London. Most well known cons always hit the cap just about every time. I think there is a HUGE untapped market here. The Anime Fans that do have money travel to the USA to go to Anime Cons. Most of my Otaku friends have done this.

I think this could be an opportunity for a North American Anime Con to tap into this market since there is a huge untapped market. Sine the pound is so cheap most of my UK friends have been flocking to the states to attend Otakon, AWA, and ACEN to name a few.

The small fan run clubs in Metro London have not the money or know how to put on a Large Anime Con. Most of the venues from a fans perspective are too expensive or ill equipped to house an Anime Convention. Most such as Earls Court or the EXCEL center are little more then huge open rooms. Very much like a dealer’s room at a North American Anime Con. Most large Hotels and event center will not deal with small time clubs for some reason here in the UK. I personally find that to be a huge injustice to the Anime Market as a whole here.

The only Hotel/event space that would even entertain the thought of hosting an event is the Park INN in Northampton for some reason.

They seem to host almost every major Sci-Fi, Anime and Fiction based conventions in the UK. I don’t know why it must be due to the hotels managements experience with working with Showmasters and other UK Companies that put on major conventions. The Anime market here is very much like the North American market was mid 2003-2004. There is plenty of room for growth even with the down sizing of major players like ADV.

Well like any place the UK is a very complex market to hold an Anime Con in. However the company or group that can do it right will succeed and maybe even make a profit.

Only time will tell.

*If needed the MOD can make this its own thread*

James Fedora
Cosplay Media and US/UK Medic

Staff Anime Boston 03,06,07,08,09
Chief of Security Connecticon 03
Co founder of Anime South
Offcial Videographer London Cosplay Ball 08
Jack of All Trades & Medic Kitacon UK 09

www.otakupunch.com
Facebook- Otaku Punch Pictures & Media


 
PatrickD 
Executive Producer
PatrickD
Loc: California
Reg: 12-07-06

07-29-08 01:24 PM - Post#2891    
    In response to Fedora

  • Fedora Said:
I think this could be an opportunity for a North American Anime Con to tap into this market since there is a huge untapped market. Sine the pound is so cheap most of my UK friends have been flocking to the states to attend Otakon, AWA, and ACEN to name a few.


How do you think North American conventions can tap into the UK market?
-PatrickD
AnimeCons.com Executive Producer
Co-Founder: Anime Boston and Providence Anime Conference
Host of The Chibi Project & Anime Unscripted™


 
Fedora 
Con Regular
Fedora
Loc: Suffolk UK & NH USA
Reg: 12-22-06

07-29-08 01:29 PM - Post#2892    
    In response to PatrickD

A simple thing they could do is perhaps advertise and or flier an convention in the UK like many North American Conventions do in the states. Many Anime Fans in the UK dont know how close they are to a US Convention. Boston or NYC is for example is only a 6-8 hour plane ride depending on the Airline.

Or another idea would be to link up with one of the established Anime Clubs here in the UK. To help them set up a trip to come to the US to attend an Anime Convention.
James Fedora
Cosplay Media and US/UK Medic

Staff Anime Boston 03,06,07,08,09
Chief of Security Connecticon 03
Co founder of Anime South
Offcial Videographer London Cosplay Ball 08
Jack of All Trades & Medic Kitacon UK 09

www.otakupunch.com
Facebook- Otaku Punch Pictures & Media


 
A x e l - F 
Con Addict
A x e l - F
Loc: So. Utah
Reg: 07-08-09

07-08-09 05:09 PM - Post#4843    
    In response to PatrickD

I'm going to add some helpful tips on first year conventions as well. My group is planning the first Anime St. George 2009 Convention this October and things have been going well for us so far because of some of these rules.

* Start Out Small and Grow Bigger.
Don't rush in thinking that your suddenly going to be a big hit. Start out small. Find a simple venue which might be willing to give you discounts if you agree to advertise them on your website or in your fliers. Talk to local businesses and see if they would be interested in having a booth. Also try to get a guest that might be willing to come to your con at a discount for in return for publicity.


* Businesses Like Advertising.
Venues that might host your convention as well as some guests might give you a discount if you agree to advertise their company on your website or give them a dealers booth in return for their discount. Also, just talk to local retailers about having a booth. You would be surprised about how many places are interested in making money just as you are. Again, don't get too head of yourself. Not everyone will come to a first year convention but may attend a second year.
A x e l - F
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